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  • Robert Crumb's original artwork sets new record
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • auctioncomiccrumbfilmflashgordonlucasoriginalpagesrecordrobertsoldstorystrip

Robert Crumb's original artwork sets new record

Four pages of Robert Crumb original artwork have sold for $155,350.

In doing so they topped Heritage Auctions' February 23-25 comic auction in Dallas and set a new auction record for the cartoonist.

Robert Crumb record

Robert Crumb's unique style has been delighting fans since the 60s

The pages, which tell the entire story of "You Can't Have Them All - Magnificent Specimens I Have Seen", appeared in Crumb's 1992 comic Hup #4.

The tale describes Crumb's fascination with Amazonian-type women – a subject Crumb fans will know well.

"There are other Crumb stories that are important for being a 'first appearance' of some character, or a first issue, or of some other significance," explains the auction house.

"However, you would be hard pressed to find a story that more succinctly encapsulates the driving essence of the man himself than this one right here!"

Crumb's artwork is controversial and always popular at auction. This new high mark beats the $131,450 achieved in 2014 for three pages of his original artwork from 1968's Zap Comix #0.

A page of original Flash Gordon artwork by Alex Raymond (1909-1956) sold for $131,450 – just shy of the $155,350 record for a strip from the comic.

Dating from October 27, 1935, it depicts a story titled At War With Ming! It features many of the strip's famous characters, including Flash, Ming the Merciless and Dr Zarkov.

Created in 1934 as a rival to the Buck Rogers comic series, Flash Gordon had an enormous influence on the science fiction genre, including film director George Lucas.

Indeed, Lucas only created Star Wars after his first suggestion, a film version of Flash Gordon, was turned down. The comic strip eventually became a film in the 1980s.

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • auctioncomiccrumbfilmflashgordonlucasoriginalpagesrecordrobertsoldstorystrip