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  • The Adventures of Tintin in... Paris?
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • AdventuresofTheTintin

The Adventures of Tintin in... Paris?

Belgian Georges Remi is better known as Hergé, the pen name he took to write his comics (the name comes from the French pronunciation of 'RG' - his initials reversed), and far and away his most famous creation, known the world over, is Tintin.

Fans of the quiffed everyman will therefore be delighted to hear that some excellent collectibles will be going under the hammer at the end of this month.

The sale is organised by Piasa and is to be held in Paris. There are early editions of the books from as little as €50 in the 230 lot auction. But the most exciting lots are expected to bring more serious attention.

One surprising piece, estimated at €100,000-120,000 is a bronze statue of Tintin, hands in pockets, and his dog Snowy. This would make an attractive centrepiece for a really serious collector, but most attending the auction will likely be more interested in the original drawings of Hergé.

Tintin L'Affaire Tournesol
Plate 7 from Tintin adventure L'Affaire Tournesol

At a similar guide price to the statue is a pencil sketch on drawing paper of Plate Number 10 from L'Affaire Tournesol partially inked, signed and dedicated to Dr. George Mercier and dated February 24, 1982.

The top lot, however, is expected to be a rendering of plates 75 and 76 of The Ottokar Sceptre. Black ink on drawing paper with gouache to provide lighting effects and a little blue watercolour, the work also sports Hergé's signature in the lower right hand corner.

Sceptre D'Ottokar/The Ottokar Sceptre
Plates 75-76 from Sceptre D'Ottokar/The Ottokar Sceptre
(Click to enlarge)

Published inThe Little Twentieth in April 27, 1939, the 60 x 40 cm piece is expected to bring €250,000-300,000 - a demonstration that amongst comic book collectibles it's not just superhero comics which are valuable. The sale takes place on May 29.

Collectors may be interested to know that some rare pieces related to Charles Schulz and his comic strip Peanuts are currently on the market.

 

  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • AdventuresofTheTintin