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  • Video of the Week: Donald Duck battles Batman at Heritage's comics and art sale
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • oftheVideoWeek:

Video of the Week: Donald Duck battles Batman at Heritage's comics and art sale

In just a couple of weeks' time, Heritage will be serving up another helping of comics and comic book art, an area of collectibles which the auctioneer has really been showing others how it's done this year.

More than 1,400 items are going under the hammer, most of them auctioned without any reserve in an auction which covers prize examples of some really very different kinds of collectible.

One rare comic in extraordinarily good condition is a copy of Green Lantern #76, an edition which perhaps started off the period known as the Bronze Age of Comics. The Bronze Age ran from 1970-85 and differed from the Silver Age in introducing darker, more realistic problems into the storylines.

Rated a stunning 9.8 by the CGC - the only example to receive that rating - it currently carries a bid of $16,000 but is expected to more than double that price.

Silver Age (1956-1970) collectors may be more keen on the first ever issue of Daredevil which at 9.6 is the highest grade ever offered by Heritage and one of only two at that grade in existence. The comic attempts to trade on the popularity of Spiderman in introducing the character.

Also currently standing at $16,000, Heritage are expecting a strong showing for the issue, possibly setting a record for the issue.

However, the two headlines for the auction are that it includes both another selection of entrancing Carl Barks paintings (of Donald Duck and his kin) from the Kerby Confer collection (which we profiled, see below), and the presence of another copy of Detective Comics #27, the issue which announced Batman to the world.

Of the Barks paintings, the most cherished is likely to be the 1973 classic This Dollar Saved My Life at Whitehorse. Showing Scrooge McDuck telling a tale to Donald and his attentive nephews in the money bin, the oil painting is a classic of its kind.

A high grade issue of Detective Comics #27 is always exciting, and whilst this one is not quite as high-grade as the one which set the world auction record early in the year, the 7.0 rated edition has a rare claim to fame: it has had only one owner, Robert Irwin, who picked it from the newsstands himself in 1939.

Already carrying a bid of $325,000, it will be one to watch in Heritage's auction, which takes place on November 18-19 in Dallas and online.

 

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • oftheVideoWeek: