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  • Mexican war postal history collection to lead Siegel at $15,000
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • historyMexicanpostalwar

Mexican war postal history collection to lead Siegel at $15,000

A stunning collection of postal history and letters relating to the Mexican-American war (1846-1848) will top Robert A Siegel Auction Galleries' sale of US and CSA Postal History and US Possessions on July 23-24 in New York.

Hawaii 2c Black stamps
This reconstructed set of Hawaii's 2c black stamps features eight of 10 positions


The collection contains 85 folded covers and letters presented on exhibit pages and has been given an estimate of $10,000-15,000.

Over the course of the collection, which includes an extensive write-up and transcription, the complete history of the Mexican-American war is charted, with emphasis on postal markings and any significant letter content.

It begins with pre-war letters from military forts in Louisiana and includes important letters from officers in the US army, describing troop movements and engagements with the Mexican army.

Many of the letters have extremely scarce postal markings, including the "Pt. Isabel" straightline with shadow letters, "Vera Cruz" framed and unframed, and military fort markings.

A reconstruction of eight of the 10 positions of Hawaii's 1859-1863 2c Black will also star, with a $11,350 valuation. Comprising 13 stamps, there are three examples from Position 7, and four from Positions 2 and 9, as well as a further unused example from Position 7.

In June, Siegel sold The Dawson Cover of Hawaii, which is a unique piece considered one of the most important covers in the world.

More highlights include a colonial period cover that was sent from Boston to Rotterdam, via the London post office, on January 28, 1690 from the merchant John Borland to Andrew Russell.

Bearing the Bishop's Mark, the first postmark ever used, the cover is thought to be the earliest example of mail from the colonies in America featuring a hand stamped marking of any kind.

Paul Fraser Collectibles specialises in sourcing some of the finest stamps for sale.

  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • historyMexicanpostalwar