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  • Eric Clapton's co-designed guitar could rock to $5,000 at Christie's sale
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • Clapton'sco-designedEricguitar

Eric Clapton's co-designed guitar could rock to $5,000 at Christie's sale


 


Here's a reminder that Christie's is holding a sale of Fine Musical Instruments on October 14. The event follows its sale of Hollywood actor Richard Gere's guitar collection, on Thursday.

The auction will offer over 150 instruments ranging from an 18th century violin and cello by Giovanni Grancino, to an extraordinary Gibson mandolin, and to more contemporary guitars, including a C.F. Martin model designed in collaboration with Eric Clapton.

Commencing the auction is an extensive range of fretted instruments from recognised makers such as Gibson, C.F. Martin and Herman Hauser Sr. and II. Highlights will include a Gibson mandolin, style F-5, 1923 (estimated at $70,000-90,000).

The guitar was a superior innovation with design advances by Gibson's engineer, Lloyd Loar. With strong tonal articulation, this instrument is a seminal example of American mandolin design.

In addition, the sale features a C.F. Martin guitar, style 000-28EC, 1996 (estimated at $3,000-5,000), a Signature Edition guitar designed in collaboration with Eric Clapton.

Gibson mandolin guitar
A Gibson mandolin, style F-5, 1923 (estimated at $70,000-90,000)

Built to Clapton's exacting specifications, these guitars have been in production since 1996 and this work is the first guitar of the edition.

For the classical collector, the sale offers guitars from German born makers, Hermann Hauser Sr and his son Hermann Hauser II. Hermann Hauser Sr., considered one of the finest non-Spanish guitar makers, is credited for innovations in the guitars' top and body construction and his works are prized for their clear, rich sound.

His son, Hermann Hauser II, shares the physical characteristics of his father's works, but later began experimenting with size and different strutting layouts. His guitars remain coveted by players and collectors around the world.

Their works include a classical guitar, Munich, 1940 (estimated at $100,000-150,000) and a classical guitar, Reisbach, 1968 (estimated at $15,000-25,000).

Additional highlights include a classical guitar by Antonio Emilio Pascual Viudes, Buenos Aires, 1924 (estimated at $7,000-9,000) and a José Ramirez classical guitar, Madrid, 1904 (estimated at $8,000-12,000).


 

  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • Clapton'sco-designedEricguitar