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  • George Washington/Henry Clay historical portrait flask auctions for $52,650
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • ClayGeorgehistoricalWashington/Henry

George Washington/Henry Clay historical portrait flask auctions for $52,650

This rare and historical portrait flask shows the strong busts of George Washington and Henry Clay. It sold for $52,650 in an internet and catalogue auction, earlier this month (January 18 to February 1).

In total, the three-session US sale grossed more than $1m - a remarkable total for a single bottle collection. The Thomas McCandless lifetime bottle collection was described by the auctioneer as "one of the most diverse and colourful groupings of American bottles and glass to recently come to market."

"The rare and unique historical flasks exceeded pre-sale estimates, as well as our expectations. Early American and European black glass was another category that did unbelievably well."

The Washington-Clay historical flask emerged as the auction's star lot. The flask was made circa 1840-1860 by Bridgeton Glass Works of New Jersey, US.

This rare and historical portrait flask shows the strong busts of George Washington and Henry Clay41
The rare portrait flask shows the strong bust of George Washington

While the bottle's actual mold design is fairly common, this example is unlisted and extremely rare. Its vibrant light-yellowish colour and topaz tone are especially noteworthy.

The flask's bold portrait busts and crisp lettering were described as being in "perfect condition" and an "exceptional example" of its kind - all of which contributed towards its $52,650 final value.

Meanwhile, the first-ever US President George Washington remains one of the collectibles markets' greatest blue chips. Recent news includes an upcoming exhibition of what could possibly be the 'earliest' George Washington manuscript ever.

Could it be true that George Washington drew this picture of a sailboat when he was just 10-years-old? Read our full report here to find out more.


 

  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • ClayGeorgehistoricalWashington/Henry